Chicago Scenes 1


The El and Alta Vista Terrace 



The El Tracks Series 
Chicago's Eiffel Tower
Digital Prints




El Stop at Wrigley Field, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed.


El Tracks at Clark and Roscoe with Blue Street, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed. 


El Tracks at Clark and Roscoe Angular View, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed.


El Tracks at Clark and Roscoe Skyward View 1, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed.


El Tracks at Clark and Roscoe Skyward View 2, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed.

El Curve with Black Sky, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed.

El on Wabash Fading Off to Black, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed.

El on Wabash Fading Off to Black 2, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed.

El on Wabash Canyon, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  $150. Also available unframed.





Under the El - Digital print, 8" X 10"

Wild El - Digital print, 8" X 10"

El Structure - Digital print, 8" X 10"


Alta Vista Terrace Series
Artist Ruth Sackheim has produced a series of hand-colored silkscreen prints to commemorate Alta Vista Terrace, Chicago's first landmark district. The series, titled The Houses of Alta Vista Terrace, consists of three different images, with five versions of each image painted to reflect different times of day.

Alta Vista Terrace is a quaint street of townhomes located northeast of Wrigley Field and next to Graceland Cemetery. Designed by architect J.C. Brompton between 1900 and 1904, the tiny street was built after developer Samuel Eberly Gross visited London and took a liking to the row houses he saw there. Sometimes called the "Street of Forty Doors," Alta Vista Terrace is comprised of forty townhouses. There are twenty different exterior styles. Each townhouse on one side of the street is duplicated with only minor variations at the diagonally opposite end of the block.
Sackheim's images begin as original photographs. Each photograph is posterized (translated into simplified black and white shapes) and applied as a photo stencil positive to a sensitized silkscreen. When the silkscreen is exposed to a light, a negative of the image appears on the screen. The image is printed with midnight blue ink and then painted with pale, vibrant, or somber acrylic glazes to suggest the effects of light from dawn to dusk.

Based on the graceful architectural structures built in the city near the turn of the twentieth century, The Houses of Alta Vista Terrace brings to life the uniqueness that is Chicago.
This project was made possible by a CAAP grant from the city of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs.

Alta Vista Terrace Doorway at Dusk
Hand painted silkscreen, 26" X 32" framed

Alta Vista Terrace Tower at Dusk
Acrylic glazed silkscreen, 26" X 32" framed

Alta Vista Terrace Portico at Noon
Hand painted silkscreen, 26" X 32" framed

Alta Vista Terrace Doorway at Noon
Hand painted silkscreen, 26" X 32" framed

Alta Vista Terrace Tower at Noon
Hand painted silkscreen, 26" X 32" framed


Historic Chicago
Historic Chicago is artist Ruth Sackheim’s tribute to the city’s graceful architectural structures built primarily from the 1880s through the 1920s.  Sackheim’s work on Historic Chicago began when she received a camera for a birthday present. During what she remembers as a string of cool, cloudless weeks, she walked through miles of city side streets, photographing the quaint and unusual sites she never knew existed. “At times, she said, I felt I had wandered onto an old movie set or onto a real-life version of the Museum of Science and Industry’s Main Street.”

Sackheim’s original thought was to photograph old Chicago neighborhoods over a period of years and publish the photos in a book. Her plans changed when she spoke before a community group in an effort to save the building where she was living at the time. Sackheim showed the audience the photos she had taken to document the destruction of her residence. “Afterward,” she says, “I had a rush of creative energy. I went home and began using pastels to color the images.”

Out of that original effort grew a new art form. Sackheim began using a computer to alter her images, which she then painted and printed. The resulting pieces are a combination of traditional and modern.




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