Sunday, April 1, 2012

Ruth Sackheim Recent Art


El Stop at Wrigley Field, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20." 


El Tracks at Clark and Roscoe Angular View, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20." 

El Tracks at Clark and Roscoe with Blue Street, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20." 


El Tracks at Clark and Roscoe Skyward View 1, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."


El Tracks at Clark and Roscoe Skyward View 2, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20." 

El on Wabash Canyon, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20." 


El on Wabash Fading Off to Black, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20."  

El Curve with Black Sky, archival print, limited edition of 50. 11" X 14" matted and framed to 16" X 20." 

Cubs Blue, archival print, limited edition of 50. 16" X 20" framed to 22" X 28."

Alta Vista Portico at Noon, hand-painted silkscreen, 18" X 24" matted and framed to 24" X 30." 

Alta Vista Terrace Tower at Noon, hand-painted  silkscreen, 18" X 24" matted and framed to 24" X 30."

Alta Vista Terrace Doorway at Noon, hand-painted silkscreen, 18" X 24" matted and framed to 24" X 30."


Historic Chicago Re-Imagined

 Get ready to re-imagine Chicago’s architectural structures built during the Victorian Era. See how artist Ruth Sackheim uses bold color, traditional media, and digital media to transform, yet pay homage to, well-known and lesser-known sights in and near the heart of the city. Experience a modern take on Alta Vista Terrace, nicknamed the “Street of Forty Doors,” and the El, which has been called both “Chicago’s Eiffel Tower” and “Chicago’s Railroad in the Sky.” Consider how the places that transformed Chicago over one hundred years ago impact our dreams and emotions today.

The El Images

Artist Ruth Sackheim began her most recent series of El images on a cold, cloudy day in May of 2011. The temperature was only thirty-nine degrees when she took her new digital camera out for a test drive and photographed the El tracks on Wabash Avenue  in downtown Chicago. 

Then on a much warmer, glorious May day only two weeks later, she walked to the El tracks at  her favorite intersection near Wrigley Field and began photographing the underside of the El structure. She downloaded the images to her computer and began manipulating them. Eventually, she decided to use each image as a jumping off point, creating an entirely new digital drawing. Each section of the resulting images is drawn or "painted" with a mouse. 


The Alta Vista Terrace Images

Alta Vista Terrace is a quaint street of townhomes located northeast of Wrigley Field and next to Graceland Cemetery. Designed by architect J.C. Brompton between 1900 and 1904, the tiny street was built after developer Samuel Eberly Gross visited London and took a liking to the row houses he saw there. Sometimes called the "Street of Forty Doors," Alta Vista Terrace is comprised of forty townhouses. There are twenty different exterior styles. Each townhouse on one side of the street is duplicated with only minor variations at the diagonally opposite end of the block. 

Sackheim's images begin as original photographs. Each photograph is posterized (translated into simplified black and white shapes) and applied as a photo stencil positive to a sensitized silkscreen. When the silkscreen is exposed to a light, a negative of the image appears on the screen. The image is printed with midnight blue ink and then painted with vibrant acrylic glazes to suggest the effects of daylight at high noon. Based on the graceful architectural structures built in the city near the turn of the twentieth century, these images bring to life the uniqueness that is Chicago.
                      
EXHIBIT COMMENTS

***** Ruth's work comes from the heart of a true Chicagoan, who translates her love of the city she grew up in into art that will fit well into a variety of settings! 
 -- Posted by Ted Lowy on October 9, 2011 at 12:50 PM

***** I will need to return to Chicago to view the city in person, guided by Ruth's wonderfully stylized reconceptions. The juxtaposition of the two views should be stunning and instructive. -- Posted by Dan Sackheim on October 12, 2011 at 12:52 AM 

***** Ruth Sackheim's art brings a wonderful richness and depth to the architecture of Chicago. Her work brings new life to the subject structures and brings them from the ordinary to the extraordinary. -- Posted by Ann E. Fox on October 12, 2011 at 1:07 AM 

***** I am in love with Ruth Sackheim's work. Having grown up in Chicago, her city views stir fabulous memories. -- Posted by Gitta Zimmer Keith on October 12, 2011 at 4:14 AM 
*****  Love her work because she demonstrates her love for Chicago with her brilliant talent. -- Posted by Angelo Magnavite on October 12, 2011 at 2:01 PM 

http://www.chicagoreader.com/gyrobase/historic-chicago-re-imagined/Event?oid=4740200&show=commentshttp://www.chicagoreader.com/gyrobase/historic-chicago-re-imagined/Event?oid=4740200&show=comments

***** I thoroughly enjoyed your aptly titled art show.  I loved your interpretation of Chicago.  Chicago is a vibrant city and, for me, that was the theme of your art.   You went beyond the city's drab concrete hues of grays, browns, rust, and blues to make the city alive and strikingly vibrant. I thought it was beautiful. Your show didn't disappoint. Good Luck as it continues!  -- Cynthia Searcy


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